What is the environmental impact of the UK’s most popular dishes?

It’s estimated that 30% of the world’s greenhouse gas emissions are due to food-system emissions, and considering that food production is a leading cause of the rise in greenhouse gases, it’s about time we start acknowledging which of our favourite foods have the highest carbon footprint.

The total greenhouse gases from food is expected to be 2.2 tonnes of CO2 per person, per year. Once you consider that food needs to be grown, processed, transported, distributed and prepared, it’s no surprise how big of an impact food production can have on the environment.

Here at Alliance Online, we analysed 15 of the UK’s favourite meals and desserts to find out which one has the highest carbon footprint.

What meal has the highest carbon footprint?

Steak and ale pie came out on top for having the most carbon emissions, with 48,664g of CO2e to make the classic British dish, or 6,083g of CO2e per portion.

According to the findings, if you were to cook a steak and ale pie every week for a year, it would be the equivalent of travelling 16482.3km, the same distance to fly from London Heathrow to JFK nine times!

The classic Sunday dinner, roast beef and yorkshire puddings, came in second place with 14,419g of CO2e produced. Making this dish every week for a year is the equivalent to flying from London Heathrow to the Algarve and back.

In third place was the true British staple of fish, chips and mushy peas, having 5,802g of CO2e.

What dessert has the highest carbon footprint?

Out of all the desserts in the study, spotted dick was found to be the least carbon efficient sweet treat, producing 2,275g CO2e.

Commenting on the findings, Rachael Kiss from Alliance Online said:

“It’s concerning to see our study showing the sheer amount of carbon emissions our favourite meals produce, with the steak and ale pie swiping the top spot

To combat this in an everyday sense, small changes can be made. Start by growing your own fruit or vegetables or opt to shop local. Shopping locally for food can lower your carbon footprint by reducing transportation emissions and supporting sustainable farming practices within your community. Businesses can adjust their approach by buying British seasonal produce and amending menus to suit the season, as it requires fewer resources for cultivation and preservation.”

Summary

So, where do we stand with our food now? It’s time to shop local and opt to buy British seasonal produce to reduce your carbon footprint associated with transportation. By doing so, you’ll be supporting local farmers and enjoying fresher and more nutritious food!

Summary
What is the environmental impact of the UK’s most popular dishes?
Article Name
What is the environmental impact of the UK’s most popular dishes?
Description
Here at Alliance Online, we analysed 15 of the UK’s favourite meals and desserts to find out which one has the worst carbon footprint.
Author
Publisher Name
Alliance Online
Publisher Logo